What Your Money Buys

Our puppies are spayed, neutered, and will have had at least two sets of vaccines. If necessary we give the puppy Bordatella vaccine. We would prefer not to give this to very young puppies and wait until they have reached their homes. However, older puppies and puppies exposed to group situations will be given Bordatella (Kennel Cough vaccine> Each puppy will have a vet exam before they leave us. This is between five and six hudred dollars worth of Veternary care.

We allow our mothers to wean naturally and keep them with the puppies until the puppies are nine or ten weeks old. Nobody can teach a growing puppy manners like mum. We are not in a hurry to get the babies out of the house and into their new homes. Beginning lessons like bite inhibition and when no means no are best taught by the mother dog. We just continue the lessons.

We have the puppies in our kitchen after they leave the whelping room which is next to our bedroom. Puppies are always with us and our other dogs.

We introduce each puppy to a crate with a buddy. They spend the night together until they are happy with the arrangement and then we separate them so that each puppy is sleeping in his own crate.

Each puppy is microchipped and we send the forms to you so you can have his chip linked to your family's information. The microchip is in a format to be used in Canada, the US and Europe.

We welcome families here and love it when they visit us and come pick up their puppy. We then can go through puppy training excersises with the puppy and family.

If your puppy is going to fly we drive him to either Kelowna B.C., Trail B.C. or Spokane Washington and put him on the plane.

After You Have Made A Deposit

We keep in touch with you with puppy photos and updates.

If your puppy is younger than 8 weeks of age he is still being evaluated. We very much want you to have the puppy you have chosen through photos and our chatting about the various personalities. Perhaps you have been able to come to visit and have chosen your puppy in person. However, personalities and character traits are just beginning to develop. We will consult with you after the 8 week evaluation to make the final decision about which puppy will really fit in to your family. It is possible that the puppy you have chosen will not have the charateristics and temperament that you required. In that case we will make the decision to change your puppy. If there is no puppy that will suit you in this case, for example if you only wanted a female or a brown puppy and there is now no pupppy that will be appropriate for you we will refund your deposit .

Our Breeding Dogs

We breed or buy the finest quality Australian Labradoodles. They are true Australian Labradoodles from Austalian stock. These were the dogs that became so popular everybody wanted to copy them and 'doodles" became the flavor of the month.

Lilyanna's mother was the first Australian Labradoodle in North America to give birth to a litter of puppies. LIlyanna was from Tassi's last litter before she retired.

When we raise a dog to become a breeding dog we put a great deal of time and money into dna and health testing. We want to make sure the parents are the best possible pair to produce strong, healthy puppies. Sometimes we raise parents for the better part of two years, test them, love them and find they are not good breeding candidates at which point we spay or neuter and start again.

Health Testing

We first evalutate potential parents to see if their coats and their structure will improve on our ongoing Australian Labradoodle breeding program.

When the potential stud or dam is a year old we have hips and elbows x-rayed to make sure the they will not pass on the presisposition for leg problems or hip displasia.

We dna the potential breeder to test for the commonly passed on genetic disorders including early blindness and Von Wildebrand Disease. We give every breeding dog an eye exam with a veterinary ophthalmologist each year as well as a veternary exam before breeding.

PUPPY FINDS A HOME

A TRUE TALE OF A TAIL FOR SALE, BY JEAN

There once was a puppy named Jonah who was 16 weeks old. His brothers and sisters had already traveled to their homes but Jonah was still in his original home with his doggie mum and four other big dogs. Jonah spent mornings chasing the dogs in a field and afternoons sleeping under the computer while his big mum sat in a chair. Life was pretty good.

His big mum however wondered why nobody had chosen Jonah. Nobody, in his sixteen weeks of life had even asked about the little brown puppy with the rosey nose. One morning a nice lady, Marjorie called and was so excited that Jonah was still available. She was going to talk to her husband and make a deposit on Jonah. We talked at length and I told her that it seemed to me she would be the perfect mum for Jonah. That evening when Marjorie was supposed to call the telephone was silent.

The next afternoon Steven called. He lived in Texas and had just seen Jonah on our website. He thought Jonah was the sweetest puppy. He would just chat to his wife about him and call me back. Marjorie called that evening and asked more questions about Jonah. They were good questions and we had another nice talk. I mentioned to her that Steven was also interested in Jonah. Marjorie said she would get back to me quickly. I smiled as I went to sleep. Nobody had been interested in Jonah and now two nice families were looking at him.

At nine o'clock the next morning Allison telephoned from Lethbridge. She had seen Jonah on our website. He was not the colour they wanted but perhaps he would work for their family. Allison had two children, a fenced yard and had done a lot of Labradoodle research. At the end of the conversation Allison decided that Jonah was the dog for her. She said she would make a bank deposit that day and could I arrange a flight for Jonah.

Of course, not twenty minutes later Marjorie called to tell me she did in fact want Jonah. I had to explain that I had promised him to Allison only twenty minutes earlier and that Allison had the day to make the bank deposit. Marjorie was so upset. She was so upset that she yelled at me. Steven phoned at seven o'clock in the evening. He wanted Jonah too.

"Gee Jonah, you are Mr. Popular today."

Jonah kept chewing on his bone at my feet, obviously unconcerned.

By noon the next day there was still no bank deposit from Allison.

By the following morning there was still no bank deposit from Allison.

I telephoned and she said her husband just didn't want a dog with a rose nose and she was sorry she didn't let me know.

"Oh my Jonah."

I telephoned Marjorie. Marjorie was excited but had to talk once more with her husband who was out of town. I explained to her that there was a gentleman interested and I couldn't hold Jonah for her. However, Steven could have bought a Texas Pomeranian by now.

I telephoned Steven. He told me he would have the deposit in my bank by online banking within the hour.

He did.

Marjorie was not pleased.

An hour later Allison called. She was on her way to the bank. They really did want Jonah after all. I explained he was going to Texas. Allison cried.

I have received several photos of Jonah in his cowboy hat. He has a summer house in the Florida Keys and life is good for him.

The End

Not only is this tale of Jonah true it happens in some way every puppy season and with every puppy breeder. Most of the families that contact us are wonderful. They have done research and they have made ample provision for a dog in their lives. Jonah would have been a lucky boy to have gone to any one of these families.

Choosing a puppy is a big decision for families. However you can see from this story that until there is a deposit in the bank the puppy cannot be held.

After a family decides on a puppy we will hold him for one business day in order to give them time to make a bank deposit.


Will a Puppy Be An Asset to My Family?

According to a Pediatrics magazine article picked up by Reuters British News the answer is is yes.

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Dogs are no longer just man's best friend: The furry family members may also protect infants against breathing problems and infections, a new study suggests. Researchers found that Finnish babies who lived with a dog or - to a lesser extent - a cat spent fewer weeks with ear infections, coughs or running noses. They were also less likely to need antibiotics than infants in pet-free homes. Dr. Eija Bergroth from Kuopio University Hospital in Finland and colleagues said one possible explanation for that finding is that dirt and allergens brought in by animals are good for babies' immune systems. The researchers studied 397 infants who were born at their hospital between September 2002 and May 2005 for their first year. Parents filled out weekly diaries starting when the child was nine weeks old, recording information on babies' health as well as their contact with cats and dogs. Based on those diaries and a year-end questionnaire, the researchers determined that 35 percent of the children spent the majority of their first year with a pet dog and 24 percent in a home with a cat. Despite only a third of families owning dogs and fewer owning cats, the majority of babies had at least some contact with a dog at their house during the study period and more than one-third were exposed to a cat. Before their first birthday, 285 of the babies had at least one fever, 157 had an ear infection, 335 had a cough, 128 wheezed, 384 got stuffy or runny noses and 189 needed to take antibiotics at some point, parents reported. The researchers found that contact with dogs, more than cats, was tied to fewer weeks of sickness for babies.

For example, infants with no dog contact at home were healthy for 65 percent of parents' weekly diary reports. That compared to between 72 and 76 percent for those who had a dog at home. Babies in dog-owning families were also 44 percent less likely to get inner ear infections and 29 percent less likely to need antibiotics. The researchers said infants who spent more than zero but less than six hours per day at home with a dog were the least likely to get sick. "A possible explanation for this interesting finding might be that the amount of dirt brought inside the home by dogs could be higher in these families because (the dog) spent more time outdoors," the researchers wrote Monday in the journal Pediatrics. Bergroth told Reuters Health in an email that the dirt and germs a dog brings into the house may cause a child's immune system to mature faster, which makes it better at defending against the viruses and bacteria that cause respiratory problems. That theory is commonly referred to as the "hygiene hypothesis."

"In many ways, (the study is) saying, if you're exposed to a natural environment… your immune system recognizes that you don't fight the normal allergens," said Dr. T. Bernard Kinane, the chief of the pediatric pulmonary unit at MassGeneral Hospital for Children in Boston. Kinane, who was not involved with the new study, told Reuters Health not all research agrees that exposure to dogs and cats helps protect against kids' breathing problems. But he said there is an overall trend in that direction. The researchers also can't rule out the possibility that people who own dogs are less likely to get sick for another reason, and not due to protection offered by pets, Bergroth noted. SOURCE: http://bit.ly/L9suBT Pediatrics, online July 9, 2012.

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Contact information: Over the Moon Australian Labradoodles

phone: 250 442 0065. We are at 2675 - 65th Avenue, Grand Forks, BC Canada

email: ourlabradoodles@yahoo.com

alternative email: moonlab@telus.net

Our Mailing Address

Jean Byrnell, Over The Moon Australian Labradoodles,

Box 614, Grand Forks, BC, Canada, V0H-1H0